Identity of Aircraft that Flew Over Aso Rock, Causing Panic in Nigerian Seat of Power, Emerges

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How Max Air, Aircraft Flight Over Aso Rock unrestricted Caused Panic in Nigerian Seat of Power

A recent incident involving a Max Air flight over the Presidential Villa in Aso Rock, Abuja, has stirred significant concern among government officials. The Nigeria Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) has confirmed that there was no security threat, despite the initial panic.

On Friday, Ejes Gist News revealed that the so-called “unknown aircraft” (DNP4), which caused alarm by flying over Aso Rock, was a Max Air flight traveling from Kano to Abuja. This prompted the NCAA to issue a stern warning to all aircraft operators.

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The NCAA’s response followed a report from the office of the National Security Adviser regarding the unidentified aircraft over the Presidential Villa.

A top source disclosed to SaharaReporters, “The airline mentioned in this memo was Max Air flying into Abuja from Kano.” The NCAA’s warning emphasized strict adherence to aviation regulations, particularly regarding prohibited and restricted airspace.

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NCAA’s Official Statement.

Captain Chris Najomo, the Acting Director General of Civil Aviation, reiterated the critical regulations governing Nigerian airspace in a statement. Citing Part 8.8.1.21 of the Nigerian Civil Aviation Regulations (Nig.CARS) 2023, Najomo stated:

“No person may operate an aircraft in a prohibited area or in a restricted area, the particulars of which have been duly published, except in accordance with the conditions of the restriction or by permission of the state over whose territory the areas are established.”

Najomo warned that any violation of these regulations could result in sanctions, prosecution, or both. Furthermore, the intruding aircraft could face severe consequences.

Details from the NCAA Memo

The NCAA’s letter, dated April 16, 2024, and referenced NCAA/DGCA/AIR/11/16/319, was addressed to all aircraft operators. It reiterated the importance of adhering to airspace restrictions:

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“The Nigeria Civil Aviation Authority received a letter from the office of the National Security Adviser reporting a sighting of an unknown aircraft flying over the Presidential Villa (DNP4).”

Unknown Aircraft Flies Above Aso Rock Unrestricted, Sparking Fear; Presidency Issues Warning

The letter emphasized the need for all aircraft owners and operators to obtain thorough weather briefings before flights and to adhere strictly to Air Traffic Control (ATC) instructions to avoid restricted or prohibited areas.

Clarifications and Assurances

In an interview, Capt. Najomo clarified that there was no actual security threat to Aso Rock. He explained that the directive was a routine advisory, not an emergency measure. Najomo stated, “The reason the authority wrote to those airlines is because the plane was identified as being from an airline, so it was a routine reminder or advisory to be careful around restricted areas.”

"Identity of Aircraft that Flew Over Aso Rock, Causing Panic in Nigerian Seat of Power, Emerges
“Identity of Aircraft that Flew Over Aso Rock, Causing Panic in Nigerian Seat of Power, Emerges

Najomo further explained that the letter was an “all operators letter” and a public document available on the NCAA website. He noted that similar incidents have occurred near other high-security locations, such as the White House, due to factors like weather and aircraft weight affecting takeoff paths.

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While the Max Air flight over Aso Rock initially caused alarm, the NCAA has assured the public that there was no security breach. The incident serves as a reminder of the importance of strict adherence to aviation regulations, especially in sensitive areas. The NCAA’s prompt response highlights their commitment to maintaining safety and security in Nigerian airspace.

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